MBE 900 4000 Troubleshooting

Section 2.4 Wires and Wiring

Section 2.4
Wires and Wiring

Detroit Diesel Corporation recommends color coding and hot stamping wire numbers in contrasting colors at intervals of 100 mm (4 in.) or less.‪

Section 2.4.1
General Requirements

Note: Avoid renumbering DDC circuits, since all troubleshooting guides reference the circuit numbers shown in the schematic. DDC suggests including a prefix or suffix with the DDC circuit numbers when conflicts exist.

Section 2.4.2
General Wire

All wires used in conjunction with the MBE Electronic Controls must meet the following criteria:‪

Criteria for Wires:

NOTICE:

DDC does not recommend using any type of terminal lubricant or grease compounds. These products may cause dirt or other harmful substances to be retained in the connector. DDC has not tested these products and cannot stand behind their use.‪

NOTICE:

Insulation must be free of nicks.‪

  • Tape, conduit, loom or a combination thereof must be used to protect the wires. Refer to "2.5 Conduit and Loom" and "2.6 Tape and Taping" .
  • All wires must be annealed copper wire (not aluminum).
  • All wires must comply with SAE J1128.
  • All wires must be insulated with cross-link polyethylene (XLPE) such as GXL, or any self-extinguishing insulation having a minimum rating of -40°C (-40°F) to 125°C (257°F).

Section 2.4.3
Deutsch Terminal Installation and Removal

The method of terminal installation and removal varies. The following sections cover Deutsch terminal installation and removal.‪

Section 2.4.3.1
Deutsch Terminal Installation Guidelines

Deutsch connectors have cable seals molded into the connector. These connectors are push-to-seat connectors with cylindrical terminals. The diagnostic connector terminals are gold plated for clarity. ‪

NOTICE:

Improper selection and use of crimp tools have varying adverse effects on crimp geometry and effectiveness. Proper installation of terminals require specialized tools. Do not attempt to use alternative tools.‪

The crimp tool to use in Deutsch terminal installation is J 34182 (Kent-Moore®part number).‪

NOTICE:

Terminal crimps must be made with the crimp tool J 34182 to assure gas tight connections.‪

NOTICE:

If a separate seal is required, be sure to install the seal onto the wire before stripping the insulation.‪

Use the following instructions for installing Deutsch terminals:‪

  1. Strip approximately 6 mm (0.25 in.) of insulation from the cable.
  2. Remove the lock clip, raise the wire gage selector, and rotate the knob to the number matching the gage wire that is being used.
  3. Lower the selector and insert the lock clip.
  4. Position the contact so that the crimp barrel is 0.8 mm (0.03 in.) above the four indenters. See Figure "Setting Wire Gage Selector and Positioning the Contact" . Crimp the cable.
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    Figure 1. Setting Wire Gage Selector and Positioning the Contact

  5. Grasp the contact approximately 25 mm (1 in.) behind the contact crimp barrel. Hold the connector with the rear grommet facing you. See Figure "Pushing Contact into Grommet " .
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    Figure 2. Pushing Contact into Grommet

  6. Push the contact into the grommet until a positive stop is felt. See Figure "Pushing Contact into Grommet " . A slight tug will confirm that it is properly locked into place. See Figure "Locking Terminal into Connector" .

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Figure 3. Locking Terminal into Connector

Section 2.4.3.2
Deutsch Terminal Removal

The appropriate size removal tool should be used when removing cables from connectors. The proper removal tools are listed in Table "Removal Tools for Deutsch Terminals" .‪

Tool‪

Kent-Moore Part Number‪

Removing (12 AWG)‪

J 37451

Removing (16-18 AWG)‪

J 34513-1

Table 6. Removal Tools for Deutsch Terminals

Remove Deutsch terminals as follows:‪

  1. With the rear insert toward you, snap the appropriate size remover tool over the cable of contact to be removed. See Figure "Removal Tool Position" .
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    Figure 4. Removal Tool Position

  2. Slide the tool along the cable into the insert cavity until it engages and resistance is felt. Do not twist or insert tool at an angle. See Figure "Removal Tool Insertion" .
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    Figure 5. Removal Tool Insertion

  3. Pull contact cable assembly out of the connector. Keep reverse tension on the cable and forward tension on the tool.

Section 2.4.4
Splicing Guidelines

The following are guidelines which may be used for splices. The selection of crimpers and splice connectors is optional. Select a high quality crimper equivalent to the Kent-Moore tool, J 38706 , and commercially available splice clips.‪

The recommended technique for splicing and repairing circuits (other than power and ignition circuits) is a clipped and soldered splice. Alternatively, any method that produces a high quality, tight (mechanically and electronically sound) splice with durable insulation is considered to be acceptable. ‪

Section 2.4.4.1
Clipped and Soldered Splicing Method

The tools required are listed in Table "Recommended Splicing Tools" .‪

Tool‪

Part Number‪

Heat Gun‪

--‪

Sn 60 Solder with Rosin Core Flux‪

--‪

Wire Stripper‪

--‪

Splice Clips (commercially available)‪

Wire size dependent‪

Heat Shrink Tubing‪

Raychem HTAT or equivalent‪

Table 7. Recommended Splicing Tools

Criteria for Splicing Straight Leads:

  • No more than one strand in a 16-strand wire may be cut or missing.
  • Use Sn 60 solder with rosin core flux.
  • The exposed wire must be clean before the splice is soldered.

Soldering splice connectors is optional. To solder splice connectors:‪

  1. Position the leads, so one overlaps the other. See Figure "Positioning the Leads" .
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    Figure 6. Positioning the Leads

  2. Secure the leads with a commercially available clip and hand tool. See Figure "Securing the Leads With a Clip" .
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    Figure 7. Securing the Leads With a Clip

  3. Use a suitable electric soldering iron to heat the wires. Apply the solder to the heated wire and clip (not to the soldering iron) allowing sufficient solder flow into the splice joint.
  4. Pull on wire to assure crimping and soldering integrity. The criteria listed in Table "Applied Load Criteria for Terminals" must be met.

    Wire Gage‪

    Must Withstand Applied Load‪

    14 AWG‪

    200 N (45 lb)‪

    16 AWG‪

    120 N (27 lb)‪

    18 AWG‪

    90 N (20 lb)‪

    Table 8. Applied Load Criteria for Terminals
  5. Loop the lead back over the spliced joint and tape. See Figure "Recommended Strain Relief of Spliced Joint" .

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Figure 8. Recommended Strain Relief of Spliced Joint

Section 2.4.4.2
Splicing and Repairing Straight Leads — Alternate Method 1

The tools required are listed in Table "Recommended Splicing Tools" .‪

Tool‪

Part Number‪

Heat Gun‪

--‪

Wire Stripper‪

--‪

Splice Clips (commercially available)‪

Wire size dependent‪

Heat Shrink Tubing‪

Raychem HTAT or equivalent‪

Terminal Crimper for Metri-Pack 280 (12 AWG)‪

Kent-Moore J 38125-6

Terminal Crimper for Metri-Pack 280 (18 AWG)‪

Kent-Moore J 39848

Terminal Crimper for Weather Pack‪

Kent-Moore J 35606

Terminal Crimper for Deutsch‪

Kent-Moore J 34182

Terminal Crimper for Metri-Pack 150‪

Kent-Moore J 35123

Table 9. Recommended Splicing Tools

Criteria for Splicing Straight Leads: No more than one strand in a 16-strand wire may be cut or missing.‪

The recommended method to splice straight leads follows:‪

  1. Locate broken wire.
  2. Remove insulation as required; be sure exposed wire is clean and not corroded.
  3. Insert one wire into the splice clip until it butts against the clip. Stop and crimp (see Figure "Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 1" , A).‪

  4. Insert the other wire into the splice clip until it butts against the clip stop (see Figure "Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 1" , B).‪

    NOTICE:

    Any terminal that is cracked or ruptured is unacceptable as malfunctions may occur.‪

  5. Visually inspect the splice clip for cracks, rupture, or other crimping damage. Remove and replace damaged clips before proceeding.
  6. Pull on wire to ensure the splice integrity. The criteria listed in Table "Applied Load Criteria for Terminals" must be met.

    Wire Gage‪

    Must Withstand Applied Load‪

    14 AWG‪

    200 N (45 lb)‪

    16 AWG‪

    120 N (27 lb)‪

    18 AWG‪

    90 N (20 lb)‪

    Table 11. Applied Load Criteria for Terminals
  7. Shrink the splice clip insulative casing with a heat gun to seal the splice (see Figure "Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 1" , C).‪

    NOTICE:

    Splices may not be closer than 305 mm (12 in.) apart to avoid degradation in circuit performance. Replace wire to avoid having splices closer than 305 mm (12 in.) apart.‪

  8. Loop the lead back over the spliced joint and tape. See Figure "Recommended Strain Relief of Spliced Joint" .

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Figure 9. Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 1

Section 2.4.4.3
Splicing and Repairing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 2

This method is not allowed or recommended for power or ignition circuits. The tools required are listed in Table "Recommended Splicing Tools" .‪

Tool‪

Part Number‪

Heat Gun‪

--‪

Wire Stripper‪

--‪

Splice Clips (commercially available)‪

Wire size dependent‪

Heat Shrink Tubing‪

Raychem HTAT or equivalent‪

Terminal Crimper for Metri-Pack 280 (12 AWG)‪

Kent-Moore J 38125-6

Terminal Crimper for Metri-Pack 280 (18 AWG)‪

Kent-Moore J 39848

Terminal Crimper for Weather Pack‪

Kent-Moore J 35606

Terminal Crimper for Deutsch‪

Kent-Moore J 34182

Terminal Crimper for Metri-Pack 150‪

Kent-Moore J 35123

Table 13. Recommended Splicing Tools

Criteria for Splicing Straight Leads: No more than one strand in a 16-strand wire may be cut or missing.‪

An acceptable option for splicing straight leads is:‪

  1. Locate broken wire.
  2. Remove insulation as required; be sure exposed wire is clean and not corroded.
  3. Slide a sleeve of glue lined, shrink tubing (Raychem HTAT or equivalent) long enough to cover the splice clip on the wire and overlap the wire insulation, about 6 mm (0.25 in.) on both sides (see Figure "Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 2" , A).
  4. Insert one wire into splice clip until it butts against the splice clip. Stop and crimp (see Figure "Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 2" , B). ‪

  5. Insert the remaining wires into the splice clip one at a time until each butts against the splice clip; stop and crimp (see Figure "Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 2" , B).‪

    NOTICE:

    Any terminal that is cracked or ruptured is unacceptable as malfunctions may occur.‪

  6. Visually inspect the terminal for cracks, rupture, or other crimping damage. Remove and replace damaged terminal before proceeding.
  7. Slide the shrink tubing over the crimped splice clip (see Figure "Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 2" , C).
  8. Shrink tubing with a heat gun to seal the splice (see Figure "Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 2" , D).

    NOTICE:

    A minimum of two layers of heat shrink tubing must be applied to splices that have more than one lead in or out.‪

  9. Loop the lead back over the spliced joint and tape. See Figure "Recommended Strain Relief of Spliced Joint" .

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Figure 10. Splicing Straight Leads - Alternate Method 2

Section 2.4.4.4
Shrink Wrap

Shrink wrap is required when splicing non insulated connections. Raychem HTAT or any equivalent heat shrink dual wall epoxy encapsulating adhesive polyolefin is required. Shrink wrap must extend at least 6 mm (0.25 in.) over wire insulation past splice in both directions.‪

Alpha Wire Corporation

Tyco Electronics Corporation

711 Lidgerwood Ave‪

Raychem Cable Identification and Protection‪

P.O. Box 711‪

300 Constitution Drive‪

Elizabeth, New Jersey 07207-0711‪

Menlo Park, CA 94025‪

1-800-52ALPHA‪

Phone: 1–800–926–2425‪

www.alphawire.com‪

www.raychem.com‪

To heat shrink wrap a splice:‪

NOTICE:

The heat shrink wrap must overlap the wire insulation about 6 mm (0.25 in.) on both sides of the splice.‪

  1. Select the correct diameter to allow a tight wrap when heated.
  2. Heat the shrink wrap with a heat gun; do not concentrate the heat in one location, but apply the heat over the entire length of shrink wrap until the joint is complete.
  3. Repeat step 2 to apply a second layer of protection (if required by splicing guidelines).
Section 2.4.4.5
Staggering Wire Splices

Position spliced wires properly as follows:‪

NOTICE:

You must stagger positions to prevent a large bulge in the harness and to prevent the wires from chafing against each other.‪

  1. Stagger the position of each splice (see Figure "The Correct and Incorrect Method of Staggering Multiple Splices" ) so there is at least a 65 mm (2.5 in.) separation between splices.
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    Figure 11. The Correct and Incorrect Method of Staggering Multiple Splices

    NOTICE:

    A minimum of two layers of heat shrink tubing extending 6 mm (0.25 in.) past the splice must be used to complete the splice.‪

  2. Heat shrink a minimum of two layers of heat shrink tubing.
  3. Tape the spliced wires to each other. Refer to "2.5 Conduit and Loom" .


MBE 900/4000 Troubleshooting Guide - 6SE422
Generated on 10-13-2008

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