Series 50G & 60G Troubleshooting

Section 5.29 PID 111, FMI 1, Flash Code 43, Coolant Level Low

Section 5.29
PID 111, FMI 1, Flash Code 43, Coolant Level Low

The coolant level is low due to a faulty Coolant Level Sensor or a low engine coolant level.‪

Section 5.29.1
Troubleshooting PID 111, FMI 1, FLASH CODE 43

Troubleshoot as follows:‪

  1. Check the engine coolant level. If the coolant level is low, use the information found in the Series 60 Service Manual , refer to or the Series 50 Service Manual .
    1. If the code is still active, go to step .
    2. If the code is no longer active, refer to "5.29.3 Verification" .
  2. Check the Coolant Level Sensor to see if it is faulty using the DDEC Sensor Tester J 37164 (see Figure "DDEC Sensor Tester J 37164" ).
    Click to see this graphic in a separate window

    Figure 1. DDEC Sensor Tester J 37164

  3. Disconnect the sensor. The probe should be located in either the radiator top tank or a remote mounted surge tank. It should be mounted horizontally in the center of the tank to minimize tilt operation sensitivity and must be in a position to signal low coolant before aeration occurs. Typically, this is a height representing 98% of the drawdown quantity. The probe should be located so that it is not splashed by deaeration line, stand pipe or coolant return line flows. The insulated portion of the probe should be inserted into the coolant .5 in. or more past the inside wall of the tank. See Figure "Coolant Level Sensor Location - Top of Radiator Tank" .
    Click to see this graphic in a separate window

    Figure 2. Coolant Level Sensor Location - Top of Radiator Tank

  4. Open the drain cock at the bottom of the radiator and drain the coolant into an appropriate container. Remove only as much coolant as is necessary to clear the CLS probe.
  5. Remove ground wire screw and ground wire from side of probe.
  6. Loosen and remove nut from sensor lead of probe.
  7. Remove sensor lead, or unplug the two-pin connector.
  8. Use the appropriate wrench on the hex portion of the sensor and unscrew it from the radiator.
  9. Connect the sensor to the tester at the correct connector.
  10. Plug in a volt OHM meter. The tester will power up the sensor. The voltage should read about 1.8 volts when the sensor is working and in water. If you power up the sensor out of water, the voltage should go to about 3 V.
    1. If the CLS is faulty, refer to "5.29.2 Replacing the Coolant Level Sensor" .
    2. If the CLS is not faulty, call Detroit Diesel Technical Service.

Section 5.29.2
Replacing the Coolant Level Sensor

Replace the CLS as follows:‪

Note: New sensors are pre-coated with a thread sealer. If sensor is new, no additional sealant is required. If sensor is reused, apply Loctite® 567 pipe sealant with Teflon® or equivalent.

  1. Install and torque CLS to 11–14 N·m (97-142 lb·in.).
  2. Connect the two-pin connector.
  3. Fill the cooling system.
  4. Turn the ignition to the ON position. Observe or read any diagnostic code(s).
  5. Start the engine and check for leaks.
  6. Shut down engine upon completion of installation.
    1. If the code is still active, call Detroit Diesel Technical Service.
    2. If the code is no longer active, refer to "5.29.3 Verification" .

Section 5.29.3
Verification

Verify troubleshooting as follows: ‪

  1. Check the DDR to see if PID 111, FMI 1, Flash Code 43 is still active.
    1. If the code is still active, go to step 2.
    2. If the code is not active, troubleshooting is complete.
  2. If the code is still active, call Detroit Diesel Technical Service.


Series 50G and 60G Troubleshooting Guide - 6SE482
Generated on 10-13-2008

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