Series 60 DDEC V Troubleshooting

Section 18.1 DDEC Diagnostic Codes

Section 18.1
DDEC Diagnostic Codes

The DDEC V system allows for an increased processor speed and increased memory.‪

Note: Due to the nature of the DDEC V System always start your diagnosis by refering to section "18.3 First Step for Diagnosing a Fault Within the DDEC System" , “First Step for Diagnosing a Fault Within the DDEC System.”

A diagnostic code indicates a problem in a given circuit (i.e. diagnostic Flash Code 14 indicates a problem in the oil or coolant temperature sensor circuit). This includes the oil or coolant temperature sensor, connector, harness, and Electronic Control Unit (ECM/ECU). The procedure for finding the problem can be found in Flash Code 14, refer to "24.2 Troubleshooting Flash Code 14, PID 110/FMI 3" . Similar sections are provided for each code. Remember, diagnosis should always begin at the start of the section. An oil or coolant temperature sensor problem will quickly lead you to section 14, but first verify the code or symptom.‪

Since the self-diagnostics do not detect all possible faults, the absence of a code does not mean there are not problems in the system. If a DDEC problem is suspected, even in the absence of a code, refer to "18.3 First Step for Diagnosing a Fault Within the DDEC System" , anyway. This section can lead you to other sections that can aid in the troubleshooting process - where DDEC problems may occur, but do not generate a code.‪

The identifiers used by DDEC are defined and listed in Table "Identifiers Used by DDEC" .‪

Identifier

Description

Failure Mode Identifier (FMI)‪

The FMI describes the type of failure detected in the subsystem and identified by the PID and SID.‪

Message Identification Character (MID)‪

THE MID is the first byte or character of each message that identifies which microcomputer on DDEC J1587 serial communication link originated the information.‪

Parameter Identification Character (PID)‪

A PID is a single byte character used in DDEC J1587 messages to identify the data byte(s) that follow. PIDs identify the parameters transmitted.‪

Subsystem Identification Character (SID)‪

A SID is a single byte character used to identify field-repairable or replaceable subsystems for which failures can be detected or isolated.‪

Table 1. Identifiers Used by DDEC

Section 18.1.1
A Bulb and System Check

As a bulb and system check, the Check Engine Light/Amber Warning Lamp (CEL/AWL) and the Stop Engine Light/Red Stop Lamp (SEL/RSL) will come on for five seconds when the ignition switch is first turned on. If the unit is programmed for the Cruise Control feature, the Cruise Active Light (if equipped) will also turn on for five seconds.‪

If the CEL/AWL comes on during vehicle operation, it indicates the self diagnostic system has detected a fault.‪

When the Diagnostic Request Switch is held, the diagnostic system will flash the yellow or red light located on the dash of the vehicle. The light will be flashing the code(s) indicating the problem areas. If the SEL/RSL comes on during vehicle operation, it indicates the DDEC System has detected a potential engine damaging condition. The engine should be shut down immediately and checked for the problem.‪

Active codes will be flashed on the SEL/RSL in numerical flash code order. If there are no active codes, a code 25 will be flashed.‪

Inactive codes will be flashed on the CEL/AWL in most recent to least recent order. If there are no inactive codes, a code 25 will be flashed.‪

Section 18.1.2
Active Codes

Active codes are conditions that are presently occurring and causing the CEL/AWL to be illuminated. All current active codes will be displayed for the entire system, including single, dual and triple ECM/ECU applications. The display for each code is as follows:‪

Line 1: ## MID: XXX XXXXXXXX‪

Line 2: PID Description‪

Line 3: FMI Description‪

Line 4: ↑ A## PID: XXX FMI: XX ↓‪

Explanation:‪

##: Indicates the DDC diagnostic flash code number‪

MID: Message Identification Character‪

PID: Parameter Identification Character‪

FMI: Failure Mode Identifier‪

A##: Numerical count of active codes‪

↑↓: Indicates additional codes are stored in ECM/ECU memory‪

Section 18.1.3
Inactive Codes

Inactive codes are faults that have occurred previously. All current inactive codes will be displayed for the entire system, including single, dual, and triple ECM/ECU applications. The display for each code is as follows:‪

SCREEN #1; SCREEN #2‪

Line 1: ## MID: XXX XXXXXX XX ; Line 5: 1st: Last:‪

Line 2: PID Description; Line 6: Total#:‪

Line 3: FMI Description; Line 7: Total Time:‪

Line 4: ↑ |## PID: XXX FMI: XX ↓; Line 8: Min/Max:‪

Explanation:‪

##: Indicates the DDC diagnostic flash code number‪

|##: Numerical Count of inactive codes‪

1st: First occurrence of the diagnostic code in engine hours‪

Last: Last occurrence of the diagnostic code in engine hours‪

Total#: Total number of occurrences‪

Total Time: Total engine seconds that the diagnostic code was active‪

Min/Max: Minimum/Maximum value recorded during diagnostic condition‪

Section 18.1.4
Clear Codes

This feature allows diagnostic codes stored in the ECM/ECUs to be erased. An audit trail of when the codes were last erased will be displayed in engine hours.‪

Engine Hours of Last Clear Codes: XXXX‪

Section 18.1.5
Message Identification Descriptions

MID: 128 ENGINE refers to single ECM/ECU applications‪

Diagnostic codes with Subsystem Identification Characters (SIDs) that reference Auxiliary Outputs # 1-8 (SIDs: 26, 40, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56) will look up the parameter text description in a table to identify the function assigned to the auxiliary output channel.‪

Diagnostic codes with SIDs that reference PWM Outputs #1 through #4 (SIDs: 57, 58, 59 & 60) will look up the parameter text description in a table to identify the function assigned to the PWM output channel.‪

Injector Response Time Codes Long and Injector Response Time Codes Short will use a table of injector numbering to identify the appropriate engine cylinder number.‪


Series 60 DDEC V Troubleshooting Guide - 6SE570
Generated on 10-13-2008

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